Colorwork Tutorials
4 Ways to Seamlessly Change Colors for Amigurumi

4 Ways to Seamlessly Change Colors for Amigurumi

Have you ever worked on an amigurumi project that involves color changes? Maybe the head is a different color than the body or you’re trying to create stripes? Changing colors isn’t hard in and of itself, but it can leave a pretty noticeable line. While this is fine for some things, it can be frustrating to have all your hard work derailed by such a small imperfection. That’s why today we’re going over 4 ways to seamlessly change colors for amigurumi.

4 Ways to Seamlessly Change Colors for Amigurumi

I spent the last few days researching various methods to get rid of that pesky jagged edge that comes from regular color changes and what I learned is that there’s a TON of ways to do it. Like with all things in crochet, steps can be modified endlessly so even the same technique can look different between two different crocheters.

If you’re unfamiliar with changing color in amigurumi, check out this article first: Quick Guide to Color Changes in Amigurumi.

So that’s why I narrowed it down to 4 techniques that will give you a good base for understanding how to get seamless lines. Feel free to pick your favorite or experiment by combining different steps. I want you to walk away with options so you can pick the method that best suits your style.

All 4 of the following samples are made on a base piece that’s 24 stitches around. If you’d like to follow along and create your own sample, use the instructions below:

Working in your first color (Color A):

Rnd 0: MR6 (create a magic ring and work 6sc into it)

Rnd 1: inc 6 times. (12)

Rnd 2: [inc, sc] 6 times. (18)

Rnd 3: [sc, inc, sc] 6 times. (24)

Rnds 4-7: sc around. (24)

You can also follow along with this video tutorial!

1. Half Color Change

Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

In this first method, we’ll be using a technique called half color changes. This keeps the first color on the bottom and the new color on the top. This particular technique succeeds in creating smooth lines of stripes, but depending on your tension it can create a slight indent in the outline of your work. (That’s why my sample bean looks a bit misshapen.)

Furthermore, the joins created by the slip stitches aren’t my favorite, but overall I think it completes the assigned task of creating seamless stripes.

half color change tutorial photo for blog post
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

Half Color Change Instructions:

To do this you first need to have finished the last stitch of the round with your new color (B). Then, insert your hook into the next stitch, yarn over with Color A and pull up a loop. Yarn over with Color B and pull through both loops on the hook.

With the half color change instructions in mind, let’s continue the sample. Start Rnd 8 with Color A.

Rnd 8: sl st, ch 1 with Color B, starting in the same st that you slip stitched into: half color change single crochet around. (24)

Work Rnd 9 using only Color B.

Rnd 9: sl st, ch 1, starting in the same st that you slip stitched into: sc around. (24)

Rnd 10: Repeat Rnd 8, but this time starting with Color B and switching to Color A.

Rnd 11: Repeat Rnd 9, but only using Color A.

You can repeat these steps to create as many stripes as you like. After completing my second stripe, I closed up by sample by decreasing evenly, adding stuffing and sewing up the hole.

2. Loop Join: Version 1

loop join example photo for 4 ways to seamlessly change colors for amigurumi
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

For this next method, we’re going to be manipulating the working loop a bit to join rounds. There is still a slight jog in the stripes, but it’s definitely less noticeable.

To follow along with this sample, follow the instructions above for Rnds 0-7, then continue below:

Change to Color B in the final stitch of Rnd 7.

Loop Join: Remove the working loop from your hook. Coming from the back (or inside) of your work, insert your hook into the next stitch. Place the working loop back on the hook and pull it through to the back of your work. (Make sure to keep your yarn tail behind your hook as well.) Don’t ch 1. Work the first stitch of the round into the same stitch that we pulled the working loop through.

Work Rnds 8 and 9 in Color B.

Rnd 8: sc around. (24)

Rnd 9: Don’t loop join. Work directly into the first stitch of Rnd 8: sc around. (24)

Switch to Color A in the final stitch of Rnd 9. Loop join and continue working only in Color A.

Rnd 10: sc around. (24)

Rnd 11: Don’t loop join. Work directly into the first stitch of Rnd 10: sc around. (24)

Repeat Rows 8-11 as many times as you like to create as many stripes as you want. Like with the previous method, I just created two stripes before decreasing evenly to close up my sample bean.

loop join version 1 tutorial photo for blog post
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

3. Loop Join: Version 2

loop join version 2 example photo for 4 ways to seamlessly change colors for amigurumi
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

Similar to version 1, this third method uses the loop join technique (with a slight variation), but the biggest difference is that here we’re using it for every round and not just the color change rounds.

To do this, follow the instructions above to start your sample, but instead of working continuously, loop join every round.

Loop Join Version 2: Remove the working loop from your hook. Coming from the back (or inside) of your work, insert your hook into the next stitch. Place the working loop back on the hook and pull it through to the back of your work. (Make sure to keep your yarn tail behind your hook as well.) Ch 1 (if you’re working a color change round, ch 1 with the new color). Work the first stitch of the round into the same stitch that we pulled the working loop through.

After completing the first 7 rounds, loop join to start Rnd 8 and ch 1 with Color B. Continue working in only Color B.

Rnd 8: sc around. (24)

Rnd 9: loop join, sc around. (24)

Rnd 10: loop join (ch 1 with Color A), sc around. (24)

Rnd 11: loop join, sc around. (24)

Repeat Rnds 8-11 to get the amount of stripes you’d like.

loop join version 2 tutorial photo for blog post
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

While this method results in pretty clean stripes, the visible seam is definitely a drawback.

4. Slip Stitch Method

slip stitch method example photo for 4 ways to seamlessly change colors for amigurumi
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

This last method is probably my favorite because it’s the easiest and while the stripes are perfect it’s close enough that I’m pretty happy with the result.

Unlike the previous methods, there’s no fancy color changing or loop manipulation. All you need is the handy slip stitch! Basically, whenever you need to change colors, switch to your new color in the last stitch of the round. Then slip stitch in the first stitch of the round. That’s it!

Follow the steps above to start the sample, then continue to Rnd 8, making sure to change colors in the last stitch of Rnd 7. Work Rnds 8 and 9 only in Color B.

Rnd 8: sl st in the first st, sc around. (24)

Start Rnd 9 by working into the slip stitch from the previous Rnd.

Rnd 9: sc around. (24)

Change to Color A in the final stitch of Rnd 9.

Rnd 10: sl st in the first st, sc around. (24)

Start Rnd 11 by working into the slip stitch from the previous Rnd.

Rnd 11: sc around. (24).

Like in the previous samples, repeat Rnds 8-11 as many times as you want.

slip stitch method tutorial photo for blog post
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

Bonus: Back Loop Method!

So I was finishing up writing this post (like the video was already posted to YouTube) and I came across one more method that I just HAD to include. It doesn’t have a specific name, so I’m calling it the Back Loop Method and I found it after watching a Reel on Instagram from @storyland_amis. (Full credit to her for this awesome idea.)

back loop example image for 4 ways to seamlessly change colors for amigurumi
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

This method is cool because it creates a very distinct line to separate the stripes and the jog is very minimal. I think it would work great to create a clear line between a doll’s skin and a shirt, for example. Plus the exposed front loops give you the option to attach details like a ruffle or border. However, if you’re just creating stripes, the lines of exposed loops may note fit the style you want. Either way, let’s check out how to create this look!

Start with the same base sample and change to Color B in the final stitch of Rnd 7. Continue working Rnds 8-10 in Color B only.

NOTE: BLsl st = back loop slip stitch and BLsc = back loop single crochet

NOTE: When working your slip stitches, keep your tension loose and even.

Rnd 8: BLsl st around. (24)

Rnd 9: BLsc around. (24)

Rnd 10: sc around. (24)

Change to Color A in the last st of Rnd 10.

Rnd 11: BLsl st around. (24)

Rnd 12: BLsc around. (24)

Rnd 13: sc around. (24)

Repeat Rnds 8-13 to make as many stripes as you like.

back loop method tutorial photo for blog post
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

Summary

The moral of the story is that in crochet, there’s a thousand different ways to achieve the same goal and you’re free to choose your favorite (or develop your own!). Each project is different and may require different techniques or blends to get the look you want.

So which method do you like the best? Do you have a color change method you didn’t see here? Share in the comments below!

I hope you liked this article and if you want to learn more about color work for amigurumi, check out these other articles:

And if you want to try a fun project that uses color changes, check out my Jack-o-Jelly pattern for free here on my blog!

Happy stitching!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *