Stitch Tutorials
How to Make Loop Stitches for Amigurumi

How to Make Loop Stitches for Amigurumi

Have you ever come across the loop stitch before? With a texture like shag carpet, it’s not a common stitch and often crocheters avoid it because it looks pretty daunting. However, while the loop stitch is a bit more time consuming than the typical single crochet, it creates such an interesting texture and has so many fun applications. So let’s dive into how to make loop stitches for amigurumi!

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How to Make Loop Stitches for Amigurumi

Before we get into the nitty gritty of this tutorial, there are a few important things to note about this stitch. First, alongside the basic loop stitch, I’ve included 3 variations so you can pick your favorite. Some versions are easier than others and some will work better for different kinds of amigurumi.

Second, each of the following samples is started with a basic magic ring of 6 single crochet. Then I switched to the loop stitches and increased every round by 6 until I reached 24 stitches around. The reason I don’t start the magic ring off with loop stitches is simply that it’s a pain in the butt. Plus once you’ve worked a few rounds, the denseness of the loops makes it impossible to see that initial magic ring anyway. So if you want to make these samples too, I recommend saving yourself the hassle and just starting with a normal magic ring.

Also, for the purposes of using this stitch for amigurumi, all of my samples are made in the round. However, this stitch can be made flat as well and you can learn more about that in this article.

All my samples in this article are made with Wool of the Andes Worsted (affiliate link) from WeCrochet if you’re interested in trying out my favorite yarn!

1. Loop Stitch

loop stitch image for blog post
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

The loop stitch is unique in that the loops end up on the back side (or wrong side) of the work. For amigurumi this can be an issue since you don’t want the loops on the inside with your stuffing. But we’ll talk about how to fix this later. Doing the basic loop stitch like this is great if you’re attaching a separate piece to an amigurumi, like if you make a hair cap for a doll.

loop stitch side explanation for how to make loop stitches for amigurumi
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

To make the loop stitch:

  1. Insert your hook into the next stitch.
  2. Yarn over.
  3. Reach over and grab the second strand from your tension finger.
  4. Pull both loops through the stitch. You should have 3 loops on your hook.
  5. Yarn over and pull through all 3 loops.
loop stitch tutorial for blog post
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

If you want to increase, simply work 2 loop stitches into the same stitch. However, if you want to decrease:

  1. Insert your hook into the next stitch.
  2. Yarn over and pull up a loop.
  3. Insert your hook into the next stitch.
  4. Follow the steps above to create the loop stitch. When you pull the loops through, you should have 4 loops on your hook. Yarn over and pull through all 4 loops.

I recommend practicing this basic version of the loop stitch first before moving on to the variations to get a feel for maintaining tension. Plus it’s easily the simplest of all the versions.

Want to see this stitch and it’s variations in action? Check out this full video tutorial!

And if you’re enjoying this article so far and want to support me, here’s some easy (and free) ways to do that: Subscribe to my YouTube channel, like this video and share it with your friends. This helps me reach more awesome crocheters like you!

2. Front-Side Loop Stitch

front side loop stitch for how to make loop stitches for amigurumi
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

Like I mentioned above, since the loop stitched come out of the back of the work, it makes it hard to incorporate into amigurumi. However, that’s where this front-side variation comes in! In this version, the loop stitches come out of the front (or right side) of the work, so you can add them into an amigurumi design pretty easily.

front-side loop explanation for blog post
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

To make the front-side loop stitch:

  1. Place your thumb behind the yarn.
  2. Pull the strand of yarn down towards you, keeping your tension even.
  3. Going around that strand of yarn, insert your hook into the next stitch.
  4. Yarn over and pull up a loop. You should have 2 loops on your hook.
  5. Yarn over and pull through both loops.
front side loop stitch tutorial for how to make loop stitches for amigurumi
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

If you want to increase, simply work 2 front-side loop stitches into the same stitch. However, if you want to decrease:

  1. Insert your hook into the next stitch.
  2. Yarn over and pull up a loop.
  3. Follow the steps above to pull the yarn down and then going around that strand, insert your hook into the next stitch. Yarn over and pull up a loop. You’ll have 3 loops on your hook. Yarn over and pull through all 3 loops.

Tension is super important for this stitch. And I mean that not only with the loops themselves, but with the tension of your stitches as well. This one will take a bit of practice to get down, but once you get into the flow of it, it’s not too hard to master.

3. Double Loop Stitch

double loop stitch for blog post
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

Like the name suggests, this variation creates 2 loops instead of one. If you’re going for really dense fur, hair, etc… this might be the version you want to use. However, like the loop stitch, the loops of this one also come out of the wrong side of the work. Plus, because the loops are so dense, it tends to curve the project inward quite a bit (even if you’re increasing evenly to create a flat circle).

double loop stitch explanation for how to make loop stitches for amigurumi
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

To make the double loop stitch:

  1. Wrap the yarn around your tension finger twice.
  2. Insert your hook into the next stitch and yarn over.
  3. Reach up and grab both loops wrapped around your finger.
  4. Pull all 3 loops through the stitch. There should be 4 loops on your hook.
  5. Yarn over and pull through all 4 loops.
double loop stitch tutorial for blog post
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

To increase, simply work 2 front-side loop stitches into the same stitch. However, if you want to decrease:

  1. Insert your hook into the next stitch.
  2. Yarn over and pull up a loop.
  3. Make sure you have the yarn wrapped twice around your tension finger.
  4. Follow the steps above to create the double loop stitch. When you pull the loops through, you should have 5 loops on your hook. Yarn over and pull through all 5 loops.

One thing to note with this variation is that it’s very easy to accidentally wrap the yarn around your finger too tightly. Not only does this make the loops small and hard to work into, but it can cause yarn burn on your tension finger. Be careful to keep your tension even and not too tight.

Want to give this stitch a try? Check out my free Hernando the Hedgehog pattern right here on my blog!

4. Front-Side Double Loop Stitch

front side double loop stitch for how to make loop stitches for amigurumi.
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

Just a heads up, of all the variations, this one is probably the hardest. If you get stuck, I recommend checking out the video tutorial above.

Similar to the front-side loop stitch, this variation has the loops coming out on the right side of the work, so you can easily incorporate them into an amigurumi.

front side double loop explanation for blog post
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

To make the front-side double loop stitch:

  1. Place your thumb behind the yarn.
  2. Pull the yarn down and wrap it twice around your thumb, being careful to maintain even tension.
  3. Insert your hook underneath the first loop on your thumb.
  4. Insert your hook into the next stitch.
front side double loop tutorial part 1 for how to make loop stitches for amigurumi
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

5. Yarn over.

6. Pull through the stitch AND under that first loop on your thumb.

7. Yarn over and pull through both loops.

front side double loop tutorial part 2 for blog post
Image by Chanel of cbfiberworks.

If you want to increase, simply work 2 front-side double loop stitches into the same stitch. However, if you want to decrease:

  1. Insert your hook into the next stitch.
  2. Yarn over and pull up a loop.
  3. Follow the steps above to pull the yarn down, wrap it twice around your thumb, insert your hook under the first loop on your thumb, and then insert your hook into the next stitch. Yarn over and pull up a loop (going through the stitch and the loop on your thumb). You’ll have 4 loops on your hook. Yarn over and pull through all 4 loops.

It’s pretty hard to keep your tension even with this stitch, not gonna lie. Plus with the way the loops are formed it can be hard to see your stitches, so if you decide to use this one, be sure to check your stitch count periodically.

Wrap Up

Out of all 4 variations of this stitch, which one was your favorite? Which one would you use for your amigurumi? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments! I think this stitch has a ton of possibilities for adding texture to amigurumi.

If you liked this article, be sure to share it with your crochet friends and if you end up using this stitch in a project and want to show me, I’d love to see it! Tag me @cbfiberworks on Instagram or Facebook! Don’t forget to subscribe to my newsletter so you never miss an article, pattern, or special event. Plus you’ll receive some awesome free goodies too!

Have a wonderful day and happy stitching!

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